TO PROTECT WATER QUALITY, EVERY DROP COUNTS

Water Drop for Blog

Water is essential for all life, but the quality of our water is equally essential for the health of our Earth and all its inhabitants.

Water quality describes the condition of water – mostly in regards to its suitability for a need or a purpose, such as consumption or recreation.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, over 40 percent of American waterways suffer water quality issues, largely due to pollution of some persuasion.

If our water is polluted, we cannot drink it. We cannot fish from it. We cannot swim in it. To do so would create serious public health concerns. Quite simply, water pollution – or a lack of water quality – can threaten life as we know it.

But, you can do your part to protect water quality.

ONLY RAIN IN THE DRAIN
Prevent chemicals, oil, vegetation and trash from entering storm drains, which often flow to sources from which municipalities draw potable water. Waste in storm drains can lead to pollution that could render water sources unfit for consumption and recreation.

DISCARD WASTES PROPERLY
Discard all wastes – municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, pet wastes – in proper receptacles to prevent them from entering water sources.

REDUCE YOUR USE OF CHEMICALS ON YOUR LAWN AND IN YOUR GARDEN
Pesticides, herbicides and chemical fertilizers can penetrate ground water sources and cause water pollution. Consider natural pest management practices and organic fertilizers to prevent chemicals from infiltrating the aquifer.

CHOOSE BIO-BASED CLEANERS INSTEAD OF CHEMICAL-BASED CLEANERS
Chemicals from cleaners can travel from your household drains to municipal water supplies and recreational water sources. Choose plant-based cleaners to prevent the proliferation of chemicals in water.

DISCARD PRESCRIPTION DRUGS PROPERLY
An investigation by The Associated Press discovered that trace chemicals from prescription drugs can be found in the water supplies of over 40 million Americans. Do not discard prescription drugs in a sink or a toilet. Instead, surrender them to a law enforcement agency or a take-back program. If those options are not feasible, place prescription drugs in your household waste.

PUT FOG IN ITS PLACE
No, not fog. FOG. Fat, oil and grease. These substances can clog water pipes and cause significant, expensive damage to water infrastructure and the environment. Do not pour fat, oil or grease down a drain. Instead, pour it into a sealable container and place the container in your household waste. Or, find an oil recycling program near you.

FOR MORE INFORMATION …

Protecting Water Quality from the Environmental Protection Agency

Protecting Water Quality in Urban Areas from Environmental Protection Agency

Ideas for Organic Gardening and Pest Control from Sustainable Baby Steps

Guide to Healthy Cleaning from the Environmental Working Group

Drug Disposal Information from the Drug Enforcement Administration

National Prescription Drug Take-Back Initiative

Dispose My Meds

Find a Recycling Center Near You

 

 

 

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