THE INSTALLATION OF THE FUTURE: FORT BUCHANAN SETS ITS SIGHTS ON LONG-TERM PLANNING

by Jonelle Kimbrough, Strategic Communicator
Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate

Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico has a rich and storied history. Its relationship with the United States Army dates to the Spanish-American War with the creation of the Porto Rico Regiment of Infantry, commanded by Brigadier General James Anderson Buchanan. In the last century, the site has evolved from a training camp into an Army Reserve-funded installation that is home to 59 Department of Defense Reserve units and over 26,000 Soldiers, Civilians and Family members. To ensure its mission resilience, Fort Buchanan is planning for the future with Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning.

Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning is a long-term, holistic process that bolsters an installation’s extant planning efforts. The process results in a strategic plan that supports current and future mission requirements; safeguards human health, improves quality-of-life; and enhances the natural environment. Most installation strategic plans cover three to five years, but Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning covers 20 to 25 years and incorporates elements such as energy and water security; solid waste management; and sustainable development.

Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning was first implemented in the Army at
Fort Bragg, North Carolina in 2000. Numerous installations, National Guard sites and community organizations in the United States, Europe and the Pacific have since instituted the process. Fort Hunter Liggett and Parks Reserve Forces Training Area, California were the first Army Reserve-funded installations to complete the process in the summer of 2018.

Fort Buchanan is a perfect candidate to pursue Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning because the post continually strives to improve its operations, services and resilience. “The Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate is pleased to have Fort Buchanan serve as one of the pilot sites for Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning because we know that its commitment to excellence will only strengthen the program’s benefits for the entire Command,” said Heather Brown, Army Reserve
Strategic Readiness Team Lead. “Fort Buchanan’s collaboration and comprehensive evaluation of each step in the process will allow the Army Reserve to develop the best possible path forward as it relates to strategic planning for our installations, Readiness Divisions and Mission Support Command.”

The Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate and Fort Buchanan have cultivated Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning efforts since June 2018. Senior leaders including Robert Maxwell, Chief Financial Officer and Director of Resource Management and Materiel for the Office of the Chief of Army Reserve, and Major
General Scottie D. Carpenter, Deputy Commanding General of the Army Reserve, have participated in planning sessions. Stakeholders throughout Puerto Rico and federal agencies such as the United States Environmental Protection Agency have been involved in the process, as well.

Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning will focus on Fort Buchanan’s challenges and threats, such as natural disasters and financial constraints. At the same time, the process will accentuate the installation’s strengths, such as its modernized infrastructure and bilingual workforce.

According to Colonel Guy D. Bass, Fort Buchanan Garrison Commander, secure resources and accessible assets translate into continued resilience for a post on a rather isolated island. “The unique geographical location of the installation, being ‘an island within an island,’ impacts our existing mission readiness capabilities that require resources away from the United States mainland and affects our response time to support our potential customers – both [in the] Department of Defense and [outside of the] Department of Defense – located on and off post,” explained Colonel Bass. “Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning will assist Fort Buchanan by defining its needs, missions, customers and requirements that will help sustain the installation for years to come.”

Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning will thoroughly address Fort Buchanan’s four long-term priorities, identified at the installation’s Long-Term Priority Setting Session in October 2018: 1) a world-class training complex, 2) high-performance sustainable facilities, 3) an organization of choice and 4) mutually beneficial strategic partnerships. A world-class training complex will meet current and future military training requirements. High-performance sustainable facilities will fulfill mission and readiness requirements with the energy, water and fuel capacity to sustain continuous operations for at least 30 days. An organization of choice will promote a healthy, resilient and ethical workforce and encourage the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual welfare of its team members. Finally, mutually beneficial strategic partnerships between Fort Buchanan, federal entities and community agencies will build on a shared culture of pride and trust to support responsible resource use throughout the region.

Fort Buchanan’s resulting Strategic Sustainability Plan will map a long-term planning horizon; engage key stakeholders; create a culture of sustainability; establish a system of governance; track short-term, measurable action plans; and identify resources. By the end of the year, the post will have a well-developed vision for its future: “a resilient installation that will synchronize all available resources such as its workforce, infrastructure, land and energy security,” said Colonel Bass.

“My hope for Fort Buchanan, as a result of participating in the Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning process, is that it has a plan that speaks specifically to its needs and challenges,” Brown added. “By identifying long-term visions and developing measurable action plans to meet its goals, every step along the way is a step towards a more resilient Fort Buchanan.”

“Ultimately, Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning will maintain Fort Buchanan’s relevance; bolster their ability to adapt and respond to challenges; and create conservation-minded Soldiers, Civilians and Families that comprise a truly resilient force,” said Paul Wirt, Chief of the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate’s Sustainment and Resiliency Division. “The process will also garner support for sustainability efforts at all levels of the Army Reserve and its communities, and it will increase our success in implementing sustainable practices Command-wide.” Wirt noted that Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning supports the Army Triple Bottom Line of Mission, Environment and Community, as well as the Army Communities of Excellence program.

Fort Buchanan has some unique challenges, but the installation’s ambitious goals, innovative programs and engaged residents secure its status as a model of readiness and resilience for the Army Reserve. The best, though, is yet to come. The entire region is ready to guide the future of the installation, and they are eager to see the fruits of their labor. Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning ensures that Fort Buchanan will be the “Sentinel of the Caribbean” for another century of successful service.

Army Reserve Director of Public Works Lauded for Career Achievements

The United States Army Reserve is proud to announce that Greg Vallery, Director of Public Works at Fort Hunter Liggett, California, has won the 2018 Secretary of the Army Energy and Water Management Award for Individual Exceptional Performance.

Jordan Gillis, Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, and Brigadier General Joy L. Curriera, Director of Operations at the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, presented the awards during a ceremony at the Energy Exchange in Cleveland, Ohio.

With 16 years of experience in Army energy and water programs, Vallery has served as Director of Public Works at Fort Hunter Liggett since 2014. He is the driving force behind the initiatives that have achieved a 30 percent energy use intensity reduction between fiscal years 2003 and 2015 and a 57 percent water use intensity reduction between fiscal years 2007 and 2015 for the Installation. Vallery has been instrumental in establishing Fort Hunter Liggett as a Net Zero Energy and Waste site with projects such as a multi-phase eight megawatt solar photovoltaic array and microgrid system, as well as a gasifier that will convert solid waste to energy. These efforts are improving the energy and water security at Fort Hunter Liggett, increasing the dependability of utility services, enhancing the resilience of facilities and leveraging renewable resources to meet Department of Defense sustainability goals.

Vallery has also received two awards from the Federal Energy Management Program: the FEDS Spotlight Award in 2017 and the Career Exceptional Service Award in 2018.

63rd Readiness Division Energy Manager Honored for Service

Rickey Johns, Energy Manager at the United States Army Reserve’s 63rd Readiness Division, received a special commendation from Mr. Robert Maxwell, Army Reserve Chief Financial Officer and Director of Resource Management and Materiel, for his storied career.

Johns has been an asset to the Army for most of his life. After 43 years, he retired as a Chief Warrant Officer 4 from the Arkansas National Guard. He served as the Arkansas National Guard’s Facility Management Branch Chief and the state Energy Manager for 23 years. Johns joined the 63rd Readiness Division’s energy team in the fall of 2012.

Maxwell lauded Johns for his innovative approach to energy and water management. Johns and his team have pursued initiatives such as a Building Energy Monitor Program; a Division-wide energy education and awareness campaign; an Enterprise Building Control System; and a phase change material pilot project. In 2016, the Division received a Secretary of the Army Award for Energy Efficiency and Energy Management, Small Group.

Maxwell said, “[Johns’] dynamic, positive and personable demeanor as the 63rd Readiness Division Energy Manager resulted in countless partnerships, having significant impacts in the areas of energy and water security.”

Johns has been an integral component of the Army Reserve, emerging as a leader in energy security across the federal government. His untiring work ethic and dedication to excellence have measurably contributed to the overall success of the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate mission, and his example of selfless service to our Nation is worthy of emulation.

Army Reserve Hosts Annual Workshop for Energy and Water Professionals

At the Huntington Convention Center on the banks of beautiful Lake Erie, professionals from across the country gathered for the United States Army Reserve Energy and Water Manager Training Workshop.

The Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate (ARIMD) presented the workshop in conjunction with the United States Department of Energy’s 2018 Energy Exchange in Cleveland, Ohio in late August.

Paul Wirt, Chief of the Facility Policy Division of ARIMD, opened the workshop with remarks about the Army Reserve’s contributions to Army-wide energy and water resilience. He honored the Army Reserve’s newly minted Certified Energy Managers, as well as two award winners. Greg Vallery, Director of Public Works at Fort Hunter Liggett, received the Secretary of the Army Energy and Water Management Award for Individual Exceptional Performance. Rickey Johns, Energy Manager at the 63rd Readiness Division, received a special commendation from Robert Maxwell, Army Reserve Chief Financial Officer and Director of Resource Management and Materiel, for his dedicated service to the energy program.

Judith Hudson, Chief of the Facility Policy Division at the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, then addressed the attendees. She inspired them to view their energy and water initiatives through a “lens of resilience.” “Ask yourself: what are your critical missions, and how can you support them through the activities that you are doing in energy and water?” she said. She alluded to the Army’s need to be ready in the face of natural disasters. “When the hurricane hits, how you are going to enable your Soldiers to complete their missions?” she asked, stressing the importance of assured access to energy. Hudson also urged the teams to “challenge assumptions,” so they are constantly aware of potential impediments to energy and water security and solutions to those concerns.

In the following briefings, several energy and water professionals from ARIMD and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory discussed topics such as the Energy Resilience and Conservation Investment Program; Energy Savings Performance Contracts; the Enterprise Building Control System; and the Resource Efficiency Manager Program. Anibal Negron, Energy Manager at Fort Buchanan, offered a presentation on the state of his Installation’s energy and water projects in the wake of Hurricane Maria, which devastated the Caribbean island in the fall of 2017.
Representatives from Installations and Readiness Divisions also participated in breakout groups, where they discussed their visions for a resilient Army Reserve.

Wirt closed the workshop with some words of encouragement, reminding the teams that the Army has lauded the Army Reserve’s energy and water programs as some of the most robust in the Department of Defense, the federal government and even the nation. “Go out and continue to leverage partnerships with your colleagues in the field … with utility service providers … with the national labs … with the Corps of Engineers,” he said. “Seek opportunities to conserve … to improve … to secure our energy resources. You have the power. Let’s work toward resilience now, so we can continue to be the most outstanding energy and water program – and the most outstanding fighting force – in the Department of Defense.”

Interior Lighting Campaign Honors 88th Readiness Division

The United States Department of Energy has lauded the United States Army Reserve’s 88th Readiness Division with two Interior Lighting Campaign awards.

The Interior Lighting Campaign is a recognition and guidance program that encourages participants to improve lighting systems – specifically troffer, high bay, low bay and suspended linear lighting systems and controls – in their efforts to conserve energy and bolster the energy efficiency of their facilities.

As of February 2018, Interior Lighting Campaign participants have planned or completed improvements to 1.6 million lighting systems estimated to save $28 million in electricity costs and 227 million kilowatt hours of power annually.

The Army Reserve’s four Readiness Divisions and Mission Support Command are among nearly 70 participants in the Interior Lighting Campaign, which also includes cities, universities, retail companies and health care providers.

The 88th Readiness Division was one of 13 participating agencies to receive Interior Lighting Campaign honors during this year’s award cycle.

The Colonel P. Schulstad Army Reserve Center in Arlington Heights, Illinois received an award for Highest Percentage of Annual Energy Savings for Troffer Lighting Retrofits in a Large Project. Energy efficient light emitting diodes, or LEDs, replaced T-8 fluorescent lamps in 1,225 troffers in the facility. The improvements reduced energy use by 231,000 kilowatt hours, or 72 percent, for an estimated annual cost avoidance of $16,200.

The First Lieutenant Robert L. Poxon Army Reserve Center in Southfield, Michigan received an award for Highest Percentage of Annual Energy Savings for Troffer Lighting Retrofits in a Medium Project. There, LEDs replaced fluorescent lamps in 94 troffers. The improvements reduced energy use by 15,000 kilowatt hours, or 63 percent, for an estimated annual cost avoidance of $1,800.

Contractors also installed occupancy sensors throughout both facilities. The 88th Readiness Division estimates that the sensors contribute nearly 25 percent of the energy use reductions in the Army Reserve Centers.

“We predict that [these projects] will have significant impacts on our annual energy use intensity,” said Chris Jackson, Energy Manager at the 88th Readiness Division.

As a Command, the Army Reserve reduced its energy use intensity by 17.7 percent in fiscal year 2017, compared to the fiscal year 2015 baseline.

Improvements to the lighting systems at these and other Army Reserve Centers will offer additional benefits to the 88th Readiness Division as well. LEDs have longer lives than fluorescent lamps, so they will be replaced less frequently. Thus, they will reduce maintenance demands at the facilities, and they will lessen disruptions to the structures and their occupants. They will also generate less waste. Overall, the projects will support the holistic integration of sustainability into the “battle rhythm” of the enterprise.

Energy is vital to every mission in the Army Reserve. With its efforts to improve the efficiency of its Army Reserve Centers, the 88th Readiness Division is contributing to the Command’s energy conservation goals and protecting the critical resources that ensure our readiness.

Story contributed by Anne Wagner (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Jonelle Kimbrough (Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate)

 

ARMY RESERVE SUSTAINABILITY PROFESSIONALS PARTICIPATE IN ENERGY SUMMIT

Story by Jonelle Kimbrough
Strategic Communicator, Army Reserve Sustainability Programs

Paul SSCES Quote

Two sustainability professionals from the United States Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate participated in the 2018 Sandhills Clean Energy Summit on March 9 and 10 near Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Paul Wirt, Chief of the Army Reserve Sustainability Programs Branch, delivered the event’s key note speech. Heather Brown, Senior Sustainability Advisor, delivered a presentation on renewable energy projects in the Army Reserve.

The Sandhills Clean Energy Summit is an initiative of Sustainable Sandhills, a non-profit organization that promotes sustainability on and in the region surrounding Fort Bragg.

Now in its fourth year, the Sandhills Clean Energy Summit featured participants from the State of North Carolina, North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association, University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Fayetteville Public Works Commission, Fayetteville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, Fort Bragg Directorate of Public Works, Duke Energy, and Sierra Club.

Hanah Ehrenreich, Executive Director of Sustainable Sandhills, chose the Army Reserve to join such an esteemed group of participants because the Command has developed a far-reaching reputation for cutting-edge programs and notable accomplishments.

“The Sandhills region of North Carolina is a hub for military- and community-led sustainability planning,” she said. “The Army Reserve has demonstrated leadership in sustainability that supports Army infrastructure, clean technology, and mission readiness.”

Sustainable Sandhills has personal connections to the Army Reserve as well. When Wirt was Chief of the Environmental Management Branch at Fort Bragg’s Directorate of Public Works, his team was instrumental in the development and implementation of Sustainable Sandhills as an integral part of the installation’s sustainability initiative. Brown served as Development Director for the organization from December 2007 until December 2010.

For Wirt and Brown, the Sandhills Clean Energy Summit was a prime opportunity to impart the Army Reserve’s successes, share its innovative approaches with a broad audience, and build important partnerships with community agencies.

“Energy and water are critical to nearly every aspect of the Army Reserve’s mission,” said Wirt. “Yet, we face many threats to our resources. We must secure our energy and water assets, for now and for the future. Clean energy will be a key component of our holistic initiatives, as we push the Army Reserve toward true resilience and even energy and water independence. We were pleased to share our energy and water visions with our colleagues in sustainability at this event, and we were especially honored to do so in the Fort Bragg community, which could be considered the ‘cradle of sustainability’ for the entire Army.”

“Almost 800 Army Reserve Centers are located in communities across the country,” Brown added. “It is imperative that we maintain strong relationships with community organizations such as Sustainable Sandhills to ensure that we are good neighbors and stewards. These communities support the Army Reserve with Soldiers, their Families, and their resources. We’re all ultimately striving to reach one goal: to be sustainable and resilient in the face of ever-changing challenges. By sharing successes, lessons learned, and expertise with each other, we are building enduring relationships that benefit both the Army Reserve and the communities that we serve.”

At the Sandhills Clean Energy Summit, Addison “Tad” Davis introduced Wirt as the key note presenter. Davis is the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations and the Environment. He is also a founding and current member of the Sustainable Sandhills Board of Directors.

Wirt and Brown discussed the Army Reserve’s multifaceted energy and water security efforts in their presentations. In accordance with its Energy Security and Water Security Implementation Strategies, the Command is striving to reduce its energy and water use, increase its energy and water efficiency, leverage renewable and alternative energy and water sources, and create a culture of resource-conscious Soldiers, Civilians, and Families. The Army Reserve as a whole reduced its energy use intensity by 17.7 percent in fiscal year 2017, compared to the fiscal year 2015 baseline, and it has reduced its water use intensity by 43 percent since fiscal year 2007. Advanced technologies such as automated building controls and rainwater harvesting pilots improved the energy and water efficiency of its facilities. Eighty renewable energy projects – including solar arrays and wind turbines – generated nearly 48 million British Thermal Units of power for the enterprise last year.

The Army Reserve’s energy and water initiatives will bolster the Command’s energy and water security and enhance its readiness. According to Ehrenreich, the enterprise’s achievements and lessons learned will also contribute to the cause of clean energy throughout the state of North Carolina.

“North Carolina has great capacity for solar, wind, and biogas energy production,” she explained. “At the Clean Energy Summit this year, we focused on the goal of 100 percent clean, renewable energy by 2050. The military has directly experienced the benefits of implementing renewable technologies in garrisons, and the use of renewable technologies has reduced and prevented security impacts across the globe. We were excited to learn best management practices from the Army Reserve.”

Visit sustainablesandhills.org for more information about sustainability in the Fort Bragg region.

ARMY RESERVE SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAMS BRANCH DELIVERS ANNUAL COMMAND BRIEF

Story by Jonelle Kimbrough, Strategic Communicator
Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate

The United States Army Reserve Sustainability Programs Branch delivered their annual command brief to Mr. Jordan Gillis, Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and the Environment, on February 14, 2018.

The presentation covered the Army Reserve’s accomplishments in energy, water, solid waste management and environmental quality in fiscal year 2017 and defined a “path forward” for the future. Featured projects included Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning, energy and water security investments, and awareness initiatives.

The brief lauded the Command’s achievements. Notably, the enterprise achieved a 17.7 percent reduction in energy use intensity in fiscal year 2017, compared to the fiscal year 2015 baseline. The reduction translates into a cost avoidance of over $6 million, or the cost of nine named training missions. The Army Reserve has also reduced its water use intensity by 43 percent, compared to the 2007 baseline.

According to Paul Wirt, Chief of the Army Reserve Sustainability Programs Branch, the Command’s sustainability initiatives have been successful because the Army Reserve focuses on “true” sustainability. “The Army Reserve maintains comprehensive and integrated strategies for every program through execution plans that establish a systematic, deliberate path to success,” he explained. Wirt also praised a dedicated staff and an engaged field, referring to their “passion and commitment to make the Army Reserve the very best it can be.”

In the years to come, readiness and mission resilience will be the primary focus of Army Reserve sustainability efforts. Wirt sees the future as an opportunity to incorporate sustainable practices holistically across the entire Command. “We want to achieve a conservation mindset, reduce consumption, increase cost avoidance, harness new technology, meet Federal reduction standards and become Net Zero wherever possible,” Wirt said.  “But, our top priority is to posture our critical facilities for energy and water security and independence. Ultimately, we need to operate for long periods of time – if not indefinitely – off the grid so that the Army Reserve can best mobilize, train and deploy our nation’s fighting force today, tomorrow and forever.”

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FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM HONORS ARMY RESERVE PROGRAMS, PROFESSIONALS

Story by Jonelle Kimbrough, Strategic Communicator
Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate

The United States Department of Energy honored the Army Reserve with two Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Awards this year.

The 9th Mission Support Command and Paul Wirt, Chief of Army Reserve Sustainability Programs, were among 27 FEMP Award winners.

Jared Corsi, Bryan Morris, Amy Solana, Benjamin Spiker and Christina Vicari received a Program Award for conservation efforts at Kaoru Moto Army Reserve Center in Maui, Hawaii in the 9th Mission Support Command.

Between fiscal years 2015 and 2016, the 9th Mission Support Command reduced energy consumption at Kaoru Moto Army Reserve Center by 36 percent. Improved lighting and climate control systems conserved energy, and a 99 kilowatt solar array provided renewable power. The center also reduced water consumption by 70 percent, compared to the 2007 baseline. Irrigation controls achieved a 60 percent reduction in water use in only one year.

The 9th Mission Support Command’s projects at Kaoru Moto Army Reserve Center have many benefits for the Army Reserve. Maui is located on a vulnerable, environmentally sensitive island that relies on fuel imports. Energy conservation reduces Hawaii’s dependence on foreign oil, increases its energy security and even reduces the state’s emissions by 176 tons of carbon dioxide every year. The initiatives build a comfortable and efficient facility for Soldiers and their civilian support force. And, they provide an estimated cost avoidance of nearly $105,000 every year.

For First Lieutenant Spiker, the FEMP award firmly establishes the 9th Mission Support Command as a model of sustainability for the entire Army Reserve. Spiker, the facility manager at Kaoru Moto Army Reserve Center, called the honor “prestigious” and “a huge achievement.” “The award is a motivator to build on what we have accomplished here and to share our knowledge, so others can follow in our footsteps,” he said. “For a single facility that is so far from Washington [D.C.], recognition at [the federal level] is unbelievable and really shows that the actions that we take toward energy conservation matter in the big picture.”

Vicari, Energy Manager for the 9th Mission Support Command, shared Spiker’s sentiments. “All of the hard work and coordination involved in moving these projects forward has succeeded,” she said. “The award proves the possibilities of creating energy efficient facilities and saving money in the long run for American taxpayers. It reminds me that, as far as the target may seem in the beginning, we can achieve this for other sites, project by project. For the team as a whole, and especially for those that are new to energy, it may plant a seed as to the viability of energy projects.”

Wirt was one of five honorees to garner a Career Exceptional Performance Award.

Wirt’s career in sustainability with the Army has spanned many years, from Chief of Environmental Management with the Directorate of Public Works at Fort Bragg, North Carolina to his current position with the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate.

Wirt has guided strategic and effective energy, water, solid waste and environmental quality programs that promote a culture of resource-conscious Soldiers, Civilians and Families throughout the Army Reserve. He has been instrumental in developing a Building Energy Monitor Program; managing the Army Reserve’s Net Zero sites; implementing a comprehensive facility evaluation process; and initiating an Enterprise Building Control System to increase energy efficiency at sites across the enterprise.

The Army Reserve has achieved significant successes under Wirt’s tutelage. From fiscal year 2015 to 2016, the enterprise reduced its energy use intensity by 17.9 percent – the most of any land holding command in the Department of the Army – for a cost avoidance of $6.7 million, or the cost of nine training missions. The Army Reserve has also reduced its potable water consumption by 44 percent since 2007.

Wirt shared his accolade with his colleagues and affirmed the lasting impacts of their efforts. “This award is a tremendous honor and a testimony to the dedication of our sustainability team and all of the energy and water champions across the Army Reserve,” he said. “I am fortunate to work with an outstanding group of professionals and leaders who provide the essential support to affect real change while drastically reducing our consumption and realizing significant cost avoidance. By embracing a collective vision to change our organizational culture and make our facilities across the world more energy and water secure, the Army Reserve has embraced mission resiliency.”

The Department of Energy will present the FEMP awards in a ceremony on November 2, 2017 in Washington, D.C.


Greg Vallery, the Director of Public Works at Fort Hunter Liggett, is a winner of the 2017 FEDS Spotlight Award.

Fort Hunter Liggett is a United States Army Reserve-funded installation near Jolon, California.

The FEDS Spotlight Award is a new initiative of the United States Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). FEMP launched and presented the awards at the Energy Exchange conference in Tampa, Florida in August 2017.

Winners hailed from 16 federal agencies including the Department of Defense, the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Records and Archives Administration, the Department of the Interior, the Department of Justice, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Vallery was one of 31 winners in the inaugural round of awards and one of two professionals from the Department of the Army to receive the accolade.

Federal agencies and FEMP personnel selected the recipients, who were described as “energy champions who embody the principles of efficient and innovative energy, water and fleet management by connecting, collaborating and conserving.”

FEMP honored Vallery for his work to establish Fort Hunter Liggett as one of the Army’s first Net Zero sites. During his tenure as Director of Public Works, Vallery has collaborated with the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to install eight megawatts of solar systems on post. He has partnered with other national laboratories, the United States Army Corps of Engineers – Huntsville’s Center of Excellence, the Electric Power Research Institute and local utility providers to implement numerous projects that will reduce Fort Hunter Liggett’s dependence on the municipal grid and bolster the installation’s energy security for years to come.

With Vallery’s dedication and innovation, Fort Hunter Liggett leads the Army Reserve in energy and water conservation and efficiency. The installation reduced its energy use intensity by 30 percent
between fiscal year 2003 and 2015 and potable water use intensity by 57 percent between fiscal year 2007 and 2015. Renewable technologies produce nearly 30 percent of the power on post.

As a Command, the Army Reserve reduced its energy use intensity by 17.9 percent between fiscal year 2015 and 2016 for a cost avoidance of $6.7 million, or the level of funding to produce nine training missions.

“It is truly an honor to have been nominated and selected by my fellow colleagues,” said Vallery. “The collaborative team for the Army Reserve is pushing forward for our installations and facilities
to be resilient and sustainable in supporting readiness of the warfighter.”

Energy conservation and efficiency initiatives ensure that the Army Reserve’s Soldiers have the energy that they need – where they need it and when they need it, today and tomorrow, at Fort Hunter Liggett and around the world.

PLUGGING INTO ENERGY EFFICIENCY

EV Stat

Story by Dmitrii Cordero Mojica, Francisco Mendez and Anibal Negron Rodriguez
Fort Buchanan Directorate of Public Works

As part of Installation efforts to increase energy efficiency, improve infrastructure and reduce its resource “bootprint,” Fort Buchanan in Puerto Rico has plugged into electric vehicle charging stations.

Fort Buchanan’s mission is to provide standardized services and sustainable infrastructure in support of the Armed Forces and the diverse Fort Buchanan community. The Garrison is committed to protecting natural, cultural and human resources; promoting pollution prevention through the continual improvement of environmental management technologies; and implementing energy, water and fuel efficiency measures that comply with all applicable laws, regulations and Executive Orders. To that end, the Fort Buchanan Directorate of Public Works has leveraged funding through an Energy Savings Performance Contract to install eight electric vehicle charging stations on post.

The electric vehicle charging stations will provide power to the new plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the Installation’s General Services Administration fleet, and they are located at the Directorate of Public Works, at the 1st Mission Support Command and at the Logistics Readiness Center.

Fleet managers can use remote management and control services to monitor the use status of each station, determine the amount of power flowing to each vehicle and identify any required preventative maintenance.

In conjunction with this effort, Fort Buchanan’s Logistics Readiness Center has collaborated with the General Services Administration fleet manager to acquire more electric vehicles through a continuous vehicle replacement program, which will replace every fossil fuel vehicle in the fleet with a hybrid electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle. This replacement program will support the Installation’s “Environmental Management Action Plan #1: Fleet Fuel Efficiency Management,” which aims to reduce fleet greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by fiscal year 2025; to create a fleet comprised primarily of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; to provide appropriate charging or refueling infrastructure for zero emission vehicles or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; and to implement fleet efficiency management tools.

During the last week of fiscal year 2016, the Logistics Readiness Center received three plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and they expect to receive two hybrid electric vehicles and nine plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in fiscal year 2017.

This plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology combines a high capacity battery with an electric motor with a gasoline engine.

When it is connected to a standard 120-volt or a 240-volt electrical outlet or charging station, the vehicle’s battery can store enough electricity from a power grid or a solar photovoltaic canopy for the vehicle to operate in electric mode under typical driving conditions and during a short commute, therefore significantly reducing the vehicle’s petroleum consumption.

When the battery is depleted, the vehicle then functions in hybrid mode with a regenerative braking system. An “Electric Vehicle,” or “EV,” button allows the vehicle to operate in one of three modes. In “EV Now” mode, the vehicle will operate using primarily battery power. In “Automatic EV” mode, the vehicle will use battery power when possible and move to gas engine power when needed. In “EV Later” mode, the vehicle will save battery power for future use.

Fort Buchanan will continually strive for energy efficiency not only by conserving electric energy but by reducing fuel consumption as well. The plug-in hybrid electric vehicles use about 30 to 60 percent less petroleum than the conventional vehicles.