NEWS

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As part of Installation efforts to increase energy efficiency, improve infrastructure and reduce its resource “bootprint,” Fort Buchanan in Puerto Rico has plugged into electric vehicle charging stations.

Fort Buchanan’s mission is to provide standardized services and sustainable infrastructure in support of the Armed Forces and the diverse Fort Buchanan community. The Garrison is committed to protecting natural, cultural and human resources; promoting pollution prevention through the continual improvement of environmental management technologies; and implementing energy, water and fuel efficiency measures that comply with all applicable laws, regulations and Executive Orders. To that end, the Fort Buchanan Directorate of Public Works has leveraged funding through an Energy Savings Performance Contract to install eight electric vehicle charging stations on post.

The electric vehicle charging stations will provide power to the new plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the Installation’s General Services Administration fleet, and they are located at the Directorate of Public Works, at the 1st Mission Support Command and at the Logistics Readiness Center.

Fleet managers can use remote management and control services to monitor the use status of each station, determine the amount of power flowing to each vehicle and identify any required preventative maintenance.

In conjunction with this effort, Fort Buchanan’s Logistics Readiness Center has collaborated with the General Services Administration fleet manager to acquire more electric vehicles through a continuous vehicle replacement program, which will replace every fossil fuel vehicle in the fleet with a hybrid electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle. This replacement program will support the Installation’s “Environmental Management Action Plan #1: Fleet Fuel Efficiency Management,” which aims to reduce fleet greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by fiscal year 2025; to create a fleet comprised primarily of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; to provide appropriate charging or refueling infrastructure for zero emission vehicles or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; and to implement fleet efficiency management tools.

During the last week of fiscal year 2016, the Logistics Readiness Center received three plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and they expect to receive two hybrid electric vehicles and nine plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in fiscal year 2017.

This plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology combines a high capacity battery with an electric motor with a gasoline engine.

When it is connected to a standard 120-volt or a 240-volt electrical outlet or charging station, the vehicle’s battery can store enough electricity from a power grid or a solar photovoltaic canopy for the vehicle to operate in electric mode under typical driving conditions and during a short commute, therefore significantly reducing the vehicle’s petroleum consumption.

When the battery is depleted, the vehicle then functions in hybrid mode with a regenerative braking system. An “Electric Vehicle,” or “EV,” button allows the vehicle to operate in one of three modes. In “EV Now” mode, the vehicle will operate using primarily battery power. In “Automatic EV” mode, the vehicle will use battery power when possible and move to gas engine power when needed. In “EV Later” mode, the vehicle will save battery power for future use.

Fort Buchanan will continually strive for energy efficiency not only by conserving electric energy but by reducing fuel consumption as well. The plug-in hybrid electric vehicles use about 30 to 60 percent less petroleum than the conventional vehicles.

Article contributed by Dmitrii Cordero, Francisco Mendez and Anibal Negron
Fort Buchanan Directorate of Public Works

POWER PLAYERS: BUILDING ENERGY MONITORS TRAINED AT FORT BUCHANAN

The United States Army Reserve strives to protect its critical energy assets for the missions of today and the missions of tomorrow. Often, facility occupants are the first lines of defense, and Building Energy Monitors lead the charge for conservation.

Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico boasts a robust Building Energy Monitor Program. Dmitrii Cordero Mojica of Fort Buchanan’s Directorate of Public Works and Heather Brown of Army Reserve Sustainability Programs trained 30 Building Energy Monitors during Earth Day observances in April.

In their roles, Building Energy Monitors will thoroughly assess facilities and identify opportunities for energy conservation. They will educate their peers and encourage sustainable practices. They will also collaborate with Energy Managers at Installations, Regional Support Commands and the Mission Support Command. Ultimately, their efforts impact the development of energy projects that save resources and avoid costs for the Army Reserve. Colonel Glenn Kiesewetter, Director of the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate, called Building Energy Monitors the “force multipliers in the Army Reserve’s Energy Program.”

The Building Energy Monitors at Fort Buchanan certainly heed their callings. During their training, they addressed instances of energy waste in the Installation’s 1300 area, which is slated for demolition. Cordero Mojica and his colleagues investigated the claims in facility surveys. So far, the team has identified and corrected 27,332 kilowatt hours of energy wastes that represent a cost avoidance of nearly $5,000 each year. The Directorate of Public Works will inspect more 1300 area facilities in the future.

“Fort Buchanan is well on track toward the Army Reserve’s energy goals,” said Cordero Mojica, the Installation’s Resource Efficiency Manager. “Building Energy Monitor training is key at our Installation for the advancement and sustainment of the goals established in our Energy Conservation Management Action Plan. This training will create awareness of energy conservation efforts and push our facility coordinators and environmental compliance officers toward mission readiness, sustainability efforts and community resilience.”

The successes of the Building Energy Monitor Program, and other energy initiatives, are apparent at Fort Buchanan. The Installation reduced its energy use intensity by 9.5 percent in fiscal year 2016, compared to the 2015 baseline. As an enterprise, the Army Reserve reduced its energy use intensity by 17.9 percent, for a cost avoidance of $6.7 million or the level of funding to conduct nine training missions. Fort Buchanan contributed 6.8 percent of that entire reduction.

Energy conservation is a top priority for the Department of Defense and Goal One of the Army Reserve Energy Security Implementation Strategy. Building Energy Monitors, at Fort Buchanan and beyond, are achieving this goal by shaping resource-conscious Soldiers, Civilians and Families for generations to come.

 

 

Army Reserve Environmental Strategy Signed, Sealed, Delivered

Major General Peter Lennon, United States Army Reserve Deputy Commanding General (Support), has signed the Army Reserve Environmental Quality Implementation Strategy and the Army Reserve Environmental Quality Policy.

The documents solidify the Army Reserve’s commitment to environmental stewardship with four strategic goals: to conserve natural and cultural resources; to ensure compliance with environmental laws and regulations; to prevent pollution of land, air and water resources; and to strengthen an integrated Environmental Quality Program foundation.

The strategy and policy also bolster Command support of sustainability objectives that will ensure continued readiness. Furthermore, they encourage Soldiers, Civilians and Families at all levels of the Army Reserve and its surrounding communities to foster a conservation minded culture.

“The execution of these guiding documents will serve to strengthen the Army Reserve’s ability to sustain the environmental quality of our land, air, water, and natural and cultural resources and therefore ensure the resiliency of our Installations and facilities across the Army Reserve,” said Paul Wirt, Chief of the Army Reserve Sustainability Programs Branch, which is a part of the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate.

All four of the Army Reserve sustainability programs – energy, water, solid waste and environmental quality – now have signed implementation strategies.

The Army Reserve relies on dependable energy, clean water, accessible land and viable air to fulfill its role as a capable and resilient defense force, as well as its role as a good neighbor. “Sustainability enhances our readiness and resiliency for the mission and warfighters of today as well as the mission and warfighters of tomorrow,” said Wirt. “Sustainability allows us to adapt to constantly evolving military objectives, maintain our relevance, allocate our resources efficiently and reduce our environmental impacts.”

“Army Reserve leadership support for sustainability has been tremendous,” Wirt continued. “Such support lends invaluable credibility to our programs and will further the Army Reserve’s position as a pioneering leader in the Department of Defense. While there is still much to do going forward, our entire team is proud of the accomplishments we have achieved so far in establishing a solid foundation of culture change in the Army Reserve.”

ARMY RESERVE REDUCES ENERGY USE INTENSITY IN FISCAL YEAR 2016

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Energy touches nearly every aspect of the United States Army Reserve’s mission, from the electricity that powers our Army Reserve Centers to the fuel that powers our vehicles. To maintain readiness and adapt to a constantly evolving global presence, the Army Reserve is striving to conserve energy and other vital assets.

In fiscal year 2016, the Army Reserve proved its commitment to that goal.

According to the United States Army Reserve Fiscal Year 2016 Annual Energy Management Report, the Army Reserve achieved a 17.9 percent reduction in energy use intensity last year, compared to the fiscal year 2015 baseline. The reduction far exceeded a Federal goal of a 2.5 percent annual reduction in energy use intensity.

“The Army Reserve is a leader in the Department of Defense’s charge to save natural, fiscal and operational resources and to accomplish goals toward energy security,” said Paul Wirt, Chief of the Army Reserve Sustainability Programs Branch.

Nine of the ten Army Reserve-funded Installations, Regional Support Commands and Mission Support Command reported a reduction in energy use intensity, and seven of those ten sites reported reductions of at least 12 percent.

Furthermore, the enterprise’s reduction in energy use intensity translated into a significant cost avoidance of $6.7 million in fiscal year 2016 – a cost equivalent to staging nine Army Reserve training exercises.

“If we can conserve energy in our facilities, we can ensure that our resources are directed to our most critical missions,” Wirt explained. “If we are reducing the energy consumption and cost for services such as lighting and heating, we can focus our efforts and attention on energy security and resilience for our facilities.”

Diverse initiatives throughout the enterprise contributed to the Army Reserve’s efforts to save energy, increase energy efficiency and reduce America’s dependence on foreign fossil fuels. For instance, the 99th Regional Support Command leveraged a portion of its Energy Savings Performance Contract to replace fluorescent lights with light emitting diodes at Technical Sergeant Vernon McGarity Army Reserve Center in Pennsylvania, where the improvements reduced energy consumption by 51 percent and conserved an estimated 184,000 kilowatt hours of energy. The Army Reserve implemented solar projects at the 9th Mission Support Command, the 88th Regional Support Command and Fort McCoy, contributing to the generation of 46.3 million British Thermal Units of renewable energy in fiscal year 2016. Fort Hunter Liggett used heat pump technologies and other holistic energy recovery opportunities to increase the energy efficiency of four Transient Training Enlisted barracks and push the Installation toward Net Zero, when it will produce as much energy as it consumes. In addition, the Army Reserve continued its endeavors to create an energy conscious culture among the Soldiers, Civilians and Families who are uniquely positioned to serve as stewards in the ranks of the Army as well as the ranks of their communities.

Wirt believes that the successes will continue to charge the Army Reserve’s Energy Program. “Last year’s achievements are remarkable,” he said. “They are inspiring our Installations, Regional Support Commands and Mission Support Command to be even more ambitious and to expect even more robust results over the coming year. The Army Reserve is taking action to protect our energy resources because an energy secure Army Reserve is a resilient Army Reserve that is increasingly capable of accomplishing our mission today and into the future.”

Article by Jonelle Kimbrough, Strategic Communicator
Army Reserve Sustainability Programs

FOR THE SAKE OF THE SNAKE: FORT BUCHANAN PROTECTS PUERTO RICAN BOA

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Actor Nicolas Cage once quipped, “Every great story seems to begin with a snake.”

At Fort Buchanan, the story of wildlife conservation begins with the Puerto Rican boa.

The Caribbean Islands host some of the most biologically critical and diverse snakes on Earth. The Puerto Rican boa, also known as Epicrates inornatus, is important to the environment and natural heritage of Puerto Rico. However, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has listed the snake as endangered since 1970.

Fortunately for the boa, the United States Army Reserve “has its six.” Fort Buchanan – an Army Reserve-funded installation near San Juan – is leading the charge for its protection.

The Puerto Rican boa is crucial in its habitat, the lush forests of limestone hills called mogotes. Adult snakes prey on pests such as rats and invasive reptiles such as green iguanas. Boas are vital components of the food chains of island birds including the Puerto Rican lizard cuckoo and red-tailed hawk.

As necessary as it is to the island’s ecological balance, the Puerto Rican boa is vulnerable to some formidable threats.

Introduced, non-native animals such as mongooses and other snakes are competing with the boa for habitat and food. In some cases, the interlopers are turning Puerto Rican boas into meals.

Deforestation, urban encroachment and pollution have damaged the boa’s environment. As an island species, habitat loss is especially troubling for the snake. Quite simply, they have no other place to go. “Its limited geographical distribution makes the Puerto Rican boa prone to extirpation by any change created by humans or natural causes,” said Victor Rodriguez-Cruz, an Environmental Protection Specialist with the Directorate of Public Works (DPW) at Fort Buchanan.

Furthermore, poaching has contributed to the boa’s decline. Hunters have coveted the snake for its meat and skin. As early as the 1700s, Puerto Rico exported the oil from the snake’s fat as a major commodity. “[The boa was] hunted and killed due to the belief that snake oil provided relief for aching joints,” Rodriguez-Cruz explained.

If the boa faced extinction, the biological diversity on Puerto Rico would be imperiled. Natural cycles would be disrupted, and the environment would certainly suffer. Nevertheless, the people of Fort Buchanan are working to ensure a hopeful future for the snake.

Initiated in 2013 and guided by a Memorandum of Understanding with the USFWS, Fort Buchanan’s comprehensive, ambitious boa program includes the management of both the species and the land on which it lives. The Installation’s DPW and its partner agencies are capturing, measuring and tagging boas, and they are performing other monitoring activities that help wildlife biologists determine boa populations, activity patterns and habitat uses. They are also enhancing the boa’s environment through reforestation and native plant restoration initiatives.

Innovative projects are driving boa conservation forward.

For instance, Fort Buchanan is investigating the use of an advanced technology called a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag to study the boa. A PIT tag for a boa is similar to a microchip for a dog. It is essentially a “barcode” for an individual animal that can electronically transmit information on snake growth, migration and survivorship to the biologists participating in the studies.

Also, the Department of Defense Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) recently issued a grant to the United States Army Corps of Engineers’ Research and Development Center Laboratory to examine “soft release” for snakes that require translocation at Fort Buchanan. According to Rodriguez-Cruz, Puerto Rican boas have very cryptic habits. People rarely see them, but they occasionally venture into urban areas. Wildlife biologists must translocate the wayward snakes. With the soft release method, biologists capture boas in urban areas and move them to designated forests. There, the boas briefly live in man-made pens prior to their full release into the wild. Soft release allows the snakes to gradually acclimate to the forests and thus raises their probabilities for success. Rodriguez-Cruz said that the ESTCP project has the potential to increase the effectiveness of capture and translocation efforts and to reduce snake-human encounters. The Installation could also benefit financially since the ESTCP grant would cover all expenses associated with the soft release demonstration.

Outreach and awareness are essential components of Fort Buchanan’s boa conservation program, too. “By educating the public, we are eliminating a lot of misconceptions about snakes in general and especially the boa,” said Rodriguez-Cruz. The Installation is identifying snake habitat with signage, encouraging its residents to report boa sightings, and training contractors who work on the post on boa protection procedures – to name only a few of the efforts.

Committed to the protection of its largest indigenous snake, Fort Buchanan serves as an example of conservation to the Caribbean as well as to the entire Army Reserve and active Army, both of which play a critical role in the stewardship of our military’s lands and the world’s precious natural resources.  “What we do inside of the Installation for Puerto Rican boa conservation, if deemed efficient, can be useful to the management of the snake outside of the Installation,” Rodriguez-Cruz said.

The environmentally essential Puerto Rican boa has managed to survive despite the forces that jeopardize its very existence. With the Army Reserve in its corner, the snake now has the chance to thrive, and its story will be great for generations to come.

Photo by Eneilis Mulero Oliveras, Fort Buchanan Directorate of Public Works

9TH MISSION SUPPORT COMMAND RECEIVES AWARD FOR LIGHTING EFFICIENCY

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The accolades for the U.S. Army Reserve’s 9th Mission Support Command (MSC) are growing by “LEEPS” and bounds.

On October 5, the 9th MSC received the 2016 Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking (LEEP) campaign award for “Highest Percentage Energy Savings in a Retrofit of a Parking Lot.”

The award honored a lighting improvement initiative at Maui Army Reserve Center (ARC) in Maui, Hawaii, where 22 200-watt light emitting diode flood lights replaced 22 400-watt high pressure sodium flood lights. The project will save an estimated 17 million British Thermal Units of energy annually and will eventually propel the Maui ARC toward Net Zero Energy, when it produces as much energy as it consumes in one year.

The LEEP campaign is a collaborative effort between the Building Owners and Managers Association International, the United States Green Building Council, the International Facility Management Association and the International Parking Institute in conjunction with the Department of Energy Better Buildings Alliance. The campaign aims to improve the energy efficiency of parking lots and structures, and it provides resources to both public and private sector agencies that strive to achieve that goal. Since LEEP’s launch in 2012, participating sites have saved $14.4 million and 138 million kilowatt hours of power – the energy consumption of about 12,000 homes in America.

The LEEP awards program recognizes campaign members for exemplary achievements in parking lighting efficiency. Recipients collected this year’s awards at Greenbuild, the world’s largest conference and exposition dedicated to green buildings, in Los Angeles, California. Numerous and varied companies competed in 21 categories. Other winners included Arby’s Restaurant Group, the University of Minnesota and MGM Resorts International.

The LEEP award is one of several awards garnered by the Army Reserve for lighting. The 9th MSC recently received a Department of Energy Interior Lighting Campaign award for their efforts to improve energy efficiency by 62 percent at an ARC in Guam. The Army Reserve has received LEEP honors in the past, as well. The 63rd Regional Support Command won a LEEP award in 2014 for a project at Camp Pike, Arkansas. Improvements to parking lot lighting reduced energy consumption by 85 percent at that site.

FOR MORE INFORMATION …

LEEP Campaign

 

ARMY RESERVE LEADS THE CHARGE TOWARD ENERGY SECURITY

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According to the Global Energy Statistical Yearbook 2016, the United States is one of the leading consumers of energy in the world, and the Federal government is the leading consumer of energy in the United States. Furthermore, the Department of Defense is the leading consumer of energy in the Federal government, and the Army is the leading consumer of installation energy in the Department of Defense. In fact, the Army consumes 34 percent of the Department of Defense’s installation energy at a cost of over $1.2 billion annually.

For the United States Army Reserve, energy touches almost every aspect of the mission. From the power required to operate its facilities to the fuel required to operate its vehicles, the Army Reserve’s battle rhythm – both at home and down range – is dependent upon this crucial asset. Without energy, life would come to a halt.

However, threats to energy are constantly on the rise. The increasing worldwide demands for energy, the political and economic instabilities in oil-producing regions, the impacts of attacks against oil infrastructure and the effects of natural disasters all endanger invaluable resources.

Since the Army Reserve has a global “bootprint,” energy crises across the world could create conflicts that have the potential to influence military objectives. Energy affects the welfare of our Soldiers, too. Fuel convoys are among the most dangerous duties for war fighters. The Center for Army Lessons Learned (CALL) estimates that, historically, fuel and water transport missions are responsible for nearly ten percent of Army casualties in theater.

If a disruption of our vital energy supplies did occur, what would happen to the military, its infrastructure and its mission? Could the enterprise survive “off the grid?” The Army Reserve hopes that those questions will never need an answer. Nevertheless, the Army Reserve Energy Program is striving to ensure its energy security.

The International Energy Agency defines energy security as the “uninterrupted availability of energy at an affordable price.” For the Army Reserve, energy security also means that its Installations, Regional Support Commands and Mission Support Command are ready to answer the nation’s call – even in the face of a local, national or global energy emergency.

To that end, the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate developed the Army Reserve Energy Security Implementation Strategy (ARESIS). The strategy creates a vision, mission and goals that, when accomplished, will ultimately achieve energy security for the enterprise.

The first ARESIS goal is to promote energy conservation, or the reduction of the Army Reserve’s energy use, to ensure that resources are resilient and that the enterprise directs supplies to the most critical aspects of missions. Education and awareness initiatives create an informed, conservation-minded culture of Soldiers, Civilians and Families.

The second ARESIS goal is to increase energy efficiency through diverse projects. For instance, several sites throughout the Army Reserve have significantly reduced their energy consumption – by as much as 85 percent – by replacing fluorescent lights with light emitting diodes. Over 780 meters monitor energy consumption at 410 Army Reserve facilities, thus allowing Energy Managers and project coordinators to identify trends in energy use and areas where energy efficiency can be improved. With automated controls for applications such as thermostats and lights, buildings are operating at their peak efficiencies.

The third ARESIS goal is to leverage alternative and renewable energy through solar, wind and other sources of clean power. As of the third quarter of fiscal year 2016, 62 Army Reserve renewable energy projects were reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS). Two Reserve-funded installations – Fort Buchanan and Fort Hunter Liggett – are top performers in this area, generating 45.3 percent and 43.4 percent of their energy from renewable technologies, respectively.

The fourth ARESIS goal is to build a sustainable energy program foundation. The Army Reserve is engaging senior leaders in the development and deployment of energy policies, and it is building valuable partnerships with agencies that support sustainability within and beyond the fence lines. The Army Reserve is also securing human and financial capital. Energy Managers, Resource Efficiency Managers and Building Energy Monitors act as the “eyes” and “ears” of the Army Reserve Energy Program in the field. Energy professionals across the enterprise implement energy projects with appropriated funds from the Federal government and funds from third-party programs such as Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC), which pair Federal agencies with energy service companies. Agencies have used the ESPC contracting vehicle since 1998 to reduce energy costs and meet Executive Orders toward sustainability.

Moreover, the Army Reserve is pursuing Net Zero, or working to produce as much energy as it consumes over the course of one year, at as many of its sites as economically feasible. Ten Army Reserve Centers and three Army Reserve-funded Installations (Fort Hunter Liggett, Fort Buchanan and Parks Reserve Forces Training Area) are actively pursuing this ambitious target.

Because of all of these initiatives, the Army Reserve as a whole reduced its energy use intensity (energy consumption divided by gross square footage) by nine percent in only one year, from fiscal year 2014 to fiscal year 2015. According to AEWRS data, this reduction in energy use intensity saved just over $2 million, or the equivalent to the level of funding required for two and a half additional Army Reserve training exercises.

The Army Reserve has already achieved many successes, but it will not simply rest on its past victories. Instead, it will continue to lead the Department of the Army’s charge toward energy-conscious communities and an energy-secure enterprise with a mission that endures – now and for generations to come.

DO YOUR PART FOR ARMY RESERVE ENERGY SECURITY

Extinguish lights in vacant rooms.

Use natural light where possible.

Replace incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent lights or light emitting diodes to increase energy efficiency.

Power down computer monitors and peripherals at the end of each duty day.

Unplug electronics that are not in use for extended periods.

Use the “energy saver” modes on office copiers and printers.

When purchasing electronics or appliances, choose Energy Star models.

Set thermostats according to Unified Facilities Criteria 3 – 410 – 01: 68 degrees for occupied facilities during the heating season and 78 degrees for occupied facilities during the cooling season.

Close doors and windows to conditioned spaces.

Ensure that vents are unobstructed.

Change your air filters regularly to ensure that your climate control system operates at its peak efficiency.

Learn the Army Regulations regarding energy use in Federal facilities and adhere to them.

Be observant. If you notice energy waste or opportunities for energy conservation, contact your facility manager or Building Energy Monitor.

Talk to your Building Energy Monitor about practical or creative ways to save energy in your facility.

Practice energy conservation at the office and at home.

FOR MORE ENERGY CONSERVATION IDEAS …

ENERGY SAVER from the U.S. Department of Energy

ARMY RESERVE WELL-REPRESENTED AT ENERGY EXCHANGE

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Anibal Negron, Chief of the Environmental Division at Fort Buchanan, presents a brief on the Installation’s energy conservation measures at the Energy Exchange

What happens when some of the U.S. Army Reserve’s brightest minds converge? A lot of bright ideas are born. And, those bright ideas often go on to become innovative energy initiatives that conserve resources for the Department of Defense and support the military mission.

Directors of Public Works, Energy Managers, Resource Efficiency Managers and members of the Army Reserve Installation Management Directorate (ARIMD) Energy Team descended on Providence, Rhode Island in August for the annual Federal government’s Energy Exchange.

Hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Energy Exchange is an educational forum that provides opportunities for energy professionals to learn more about energy management and sustainability in the Federal sector and to establish contacts with others in the field.

To commence the activities, ARIMD hosted the Army Reserve Energy Manager Training Workshop on Monday, August 8. At the event, Army Reserve representatives presented reports on Comprehensive Energy and Water Evaluations, assessments on metering and utility monitoring and briefs on a variety of energy projects. Ms. Judith Hudson, Chief of the Energy and Facility Policy Division at the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, and Ms. Kristine Kingery, Program Director at the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Energy and Sustainability, addressed the participants and discussed the importance of energy security and sustainability initiatives to the Army Reserve’s mission.

Throughout the following days, attendees enjoyed a trade show and sessions on topics such as integrated energy, sustainability planning, renewable energy, fleet management and project financing.

The Secretary of the Army Energy and Water Management Awards ceremony was held on Thursday, August 11. The 63rd Regional Support Command accepted honors for Energy Efficiency and Energy Management, Small Group.

On Friday, Army Energy Managers gathered for the Department of Army Energy Manager Training Workshop to close the week.

Several Army Reserve delegates were among the presenters.

Mr. Anibal Negron, Chief of the Environmental Division at the Directorate of Public Works at Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico, shared his expertise on the use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts and the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program to fund numerous energy conservation measures on the Installation. He also offered a progress report on Fort Buchanan’s efforts to achieve Net Zero energy, or to produce as much energy as the Installation consumes.

Mr. Greg Vallery, Director of Public Works at Fort Hunter Liggett, California, discussed his Installation’s renewable energy projects and Net Zero initiatives.

Mr. Paul Wirt and Ms. Robin Robinson of ARIMD presented on the Utility Rates Analysis Study, which will determine the utility rate structures for all Army Reserve sites and identify opportunities to reduce expenditures.

“The Energy Exchange is an outstanding annual forum for Energy Managers across the country to participate on panels, share lessons learned and learn about the latest technologies,” said Wirt, Chief of Sustainability Programs at ARIMD. Wirt went on to emphasize the positive impacts that both the Department of the Army and the Army Reserve have had as a result of their sessions before and after the Energy Exchange. “We can really build a strong team when Army and Army Reserve energy and water professionals are able to meet face-to-face and discuss mutual challenges and opportunities to reduce our consumption and utility costs and to increase our energy resilience.”

GREEN GRILLING

Lump Charcoal

Firing up the grill this weekend? Did you know that your barbecue can be more sustainable? Here are some ideas for greener grilling …

BURN, BABY, BURN

Charcoal or propane: the ultimate grilling grudge match. What is more environmentally sound? With all of the factors considered, propane is more sustainable than charcoal.

Charcoal may be derived from natural and renewable resources, but it can contribute to deforestation. Charcoal briquettes often contain chemical additives and fillers that can infiltrate your food, stifle the air and leave a bad taste in your mouth – literally. Borax and sawdust … yum. (Not really.) A traditional charcoal grill also emits more harmful pollutants. While it is produced from finite resources, propane offers a cleaner burn.

If you are a charcoal fan, though, all is not lost. Lump charcoal is a healthier choice for you and the environment. Consider lump charcoal that is natural, carbon-neutral and certified by The Forest Stewardship Council.

Mesquite and raw wood chips certified by The Forest Stewardship Council and The Rainforest Alliance are other sources of sustainable fuel as well.

LIGHT MY FIRE

Come on, baby … light my fire – but not with lighter fluid. Lighter fluids also contain harmful chemicals that can seep into your food when they are burned. Try a chimney charcoal starter or electric charcoal starter to grill green.

(CUE AUSTRALIAN ACCENT) THROW ANOTHER SUSTAINABLY SOURCED SHRIMP ON THE BARBIE

WHAT you grill is just as important as HOW you grill. For a healthier and more environmentally sound barbecue, choose locally raised meats, sustainably sourced seafood and locally grown produce. You’ll support your local economy, reap the benefits of fresh food and reduce your environmental impacts.

TALKIN’ TRASH

At your barbecue, be sure to watch your wasteline. You read that correctly. Not your WAISTline. Your WASTEline. As Queen said, ‘don’t throw it all away!’ Choose reusable dinnerware instead of disposable dinnerware to reduce your waste. If you cannot use reusable dinnerware, then try recyclable, compostable or biodegradable dinnerware.

Recycle as much as possible, and use bio-based cleaners instead of chemical cleaners to tidy the grill.

FOR MORE INFORMATION …

How to Go Green Guide: Barbecues from TREEHUGGER

Green Grilling from MOTHER NATURE NETWORK

Your Guide to a Green Tailgate from JUST ENERGY

How to Use a Charcoal Chimney from THE GRILLING SPOT

Find a Farmer’s Market from LOCAL HARVEST

The Smart Seafood Buying Guide from NATURAL RESOURCES DEFENSE COUNCIL

26 Genius Ways to Use Barbecue Leftovers from FOOD NETWORK

15 Things You Can Make With Barbecue Leftovers from BRIT + CO

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